There’s No Place Like HOM

As Dorothy says, “There’s no place like home.”  Why is home such a special place?  It provides us with safety, security and shelter from the elements.  It is where we rest and recharge.  It’s the place where we keep all our stuff.  Our clothes are there; maybe a TV, books and other things we use to entertain ourselves.  It’s where we eat and nourish ourselves.  It’s the platform from which we achieve healthier lives, better educational outcomes and employment opportunities.  At the end of the day, though, home is special because of the people there.  Whether that is our family, our neighbors or the larger community around us.  The people in our lives and our relationships with them enrich and strengthen our home, making it the special place that it is.

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5th Graders Bring Holiday Cheer to Formerly Homeless Veterans

A core value at HOM, Inc., is giving back to the communities that we live and work in. It’s in our mission statement, but we also put our money where our mouth is by allowing team members to take up to four hours of paid volunteer time each week. Many of our team members use this benefit to volunteer their time and talents with organizations that are improving our communities. Read more

Labeling People as Homeless Strips Individuals and Families of True Identity

I can remember the first time I was introduced to People First Language.  I was at a mental health conference when a panelist described our state legislature as schizophrenic.  A gentleman that I did not know at the time stepped up to the microphone in the audience and stated rather firmly that the characterization was offensive.  No, it wasn’t one of our esteemed state legislators! Read more

An Amazing Transformation

This post was originally written for Poverty Insights by Mattie Lord of UMOM New Day Centers.  Mattie is also a Project Coordinator for Project H3: Home, Health, Hope; of which HOM, Inc. is a proud partner.

While sitting at a stop sign, minding my own business, two men drove by and flipped me off.  I have no idea why – I did nothing to them.  Perhaps they passed judgment based on my appearance, my car, or perhaps my “Life is good” bumper sticker.  It reminded me of how often people experiencing homelessness are judged and misjudged – how frequently others make assumptions and draw conclusions without knowing anything about them.  We expect it from people who just don’t understand the issues or the population, but it is surprisingly common even within the human services arena.  Too often, our most vulnerable – those most in need of help – are overlooked or discounted by homeless service providers. Read more

Ending Homelessness with Scattered Sites Housing

This post was originally written for Poverty Insights on April 7, 2010

Permanent Supportive Housing: Scattered Sites Model

There seems to be an increased interest in addressing homelessness in the Phoenix metropolitan area.  I’m not certain what to attribute this phenomenon to; whether inspirational leadership, increased capacity in the non-profit housing and service provider industry, favorable policies emerging from the public sector, or a heightened awareness resulting from increased media coverage of our current economic climate.  Rather than speculate on the reasons for the heightened attention, we need to harness the momentum and act swiftly. Read more