Home for the Holidays

When Project H3: Home, Health, Hope launched in April 2010, several members of our HOM, Inc. team volunteered to conduct surveys of persons experiencing street homelessness between 4 and 6 AM for three straight days. Following the survey days, at the community briefing where the results of the survey efforts were announced, the HOM, Inc. team took our commitment up a notch.  We volunteered to collect and donate all of the items that would turn an empty “apartment” into a “home” for one of the participants in Project H3. Read more

An Amazing Transformation

This post was originally written for Poverty Insights by Mattie Lord of UMOM New Day Centers.  Mattie is also a Project Coordinator for Project H3: Home, Health, Hope; of which HOM, Inc. is a proud partner.

While sitting at a stop sign, minding my own business, two men drove by and flipped me off.  I have no idea why – I did nothing to them.  Perhaps they passed judgment based on my appearance, my car, or perhaps my “Life is good” bumper sticker.  It reminded me of how often people experiencing homelessness are judged and misjudged – how frequently others make assumptions and draw conclusions without knowing anything about them.  We expect it from people who just don’t understand the issues or the population, but it is surprisingly common even within the human services arena.  Too often, our most vulnerable – those most in need of help – are overlooked or discounted by homeless service providers. Read more

ABC / VSUW / LDRC Collaboration

HOM, Inc. is currently working on a new initiative seeking to reduce chronic homelessness. The project is a collaboration with Arizona Behavioral Health Corporation, the Valley of the Sun United Way and the Lodestar Day Resource Center (LDRC).  In this project, individuals with a serious mental illness meeting the definition of chronic homelessness and who are receiving services at the LDRC are provided a priority in accessing rental assistance in our scattered sites housing program.  These participants receive additional support from agencies co-located at the LDRC; like CASS, Nova, and Healthcare for the Homeless. Read more

Building a Better Life

A former housing program participant and friend, shares his story of recovery.

I have a mental illness.  One day everything came to an end when I found myself homeless and living on the streets.  I couldn’t hold down a job.

As an individual with a mental illness who has experienced homelessness I am grateful for the housing programs operated through Arizona Behavioral Health Corporation (ABC).  I was introduced to the folks at ABC over ten years ago when I found myself enrolled into the Maricopa County public mental health system.  I ended up in the hospital after spending several months on the streets and living in my car because my challenges with my mental illness had become so severe. Read more

Celebrating 16 Years of Dedicated Service

In July 1994, HOM, Inc. opened its doors for business. At that time, HOM contracted with ComCare, which was the regional behavioral health authority for Maricopa County. ComCare, in partnership with the Arizona Department of Commerce, had secured their first Shelter Plus Care grant from HUD to provide housing to 300 of their consumers with serious mental illness who were homeless. We started housing people immediately, starting with 13 individuals who were living in a run-down rehab facility that was closing at the end of our first month! Read more

Ending Homelessness with Scattered Sites Housing

This post was originally written for Poverty Insights on April 7, 2010


Permanent Supportive Housing: Scattered Sites Model

There seems to be an increased interest in addressing homelessness in the Phoenix metropolitan area.  I’m not certain what to attribute this phenomenon to; whether inspirational leadership, increased capacity in the non-profit housing and service provider industry, favorable policies emerging from the public sector, or a heightened awareness resulting from increased media coverage of our current economic climate.  Rather than speculate on the reasons for the heightened attention, we need to harness the momentum and act swiftly. Read more