The Super Bowl of HUD-VASH

On the morning of Super Bowl Sunday while most Americans are gearing up to enjoy the big game, 25 homeless Veterans in Phoenix are attending a housing briefing to receive a voucher for rental assistance for an apartment of their choice in the community. These 25 men and women were among the 1,266 Veterans that received services at the Arizona StandDown Friday through Sunday, February 3-5, at the Phoenix Veterans Memorial Coliseum. The Arizona StandDown is an annual three day event that brings together the Valley’s homeless and at-risk military veterans to connect them with services in one location. Available services include VA health care and mental health services, clothing, meals, IDs and drivers licenses, court services and legal assistance, showers and haircuts, emergency shelter, transitional and permanent housing and much more. Read more

Home for the Holidays

When Project H3: Home, Health, Hope launched in April 2010, several members of our HOM, Inc. team volunteered to conduct surveys of persons experiencing street homelessness between 4 and 6 AM for three straight days. Following the survey days, at the community briefing where the results of the survey efforts were announced, the HOM, Inc. team took our commitment up a notch.  We volunteered to collect and donate all of the items that would turn an empty “apartment” into a “home” for one of the participants in Project H3. Read more

An Amazing Transformation

This post was originally written for Poverty Insights by Mattie Lord of UMOM New Day Centers.  Mattie is also a Project Coordinator for Project H3: Home, Health, Hope; of which HOM, Inc. is a proud partner.

While sitting at a stop sign, minding my own business, two men drove by and flipped me off.  I have no idea why – I did nothing to them.  Perhaps they passed judgment based on my appearance, my car, or perhaps my “Life is good” bumper sticker.  It reminded me of how often people experiencing homelessness are judged and misjudged – how frequently others make assumptions and draw conclusions without knowing anything about them.  We expect it from people who just don’t understand the issues or the population, but it is surprisingly common even within the human services arena.  Too often, our most vulnerable – those most in need of help – are overlooked or discounted by homeless service providers. Read more